• Newsletters
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
°
Sunday, August 20, 2017
View complete forecast
News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.

Obstructing terrorism fight makes no sense

Rinearson
Rinearson
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press
Wednesday, April 12, 2017 12:01 am

In St. Petersburg, Russia, on the very day that the Russian President Vladimir Putin had made one of his rare visits to his hometown, a bomb carried by a 22-year old Kyrgyzstan Islamist, and packed with nails and shrapnel, exploded on a crowded commuter train killing 14 and injuring dozens of others including three children.

It was only days before the suicide bomber launched his attack, ISIS had issued an Internet warning simply saying “Russia Will Burn!”

Prior to these events, on March 22, a lone wolf terrorist drove a car into an unsuspecting crowd in London near Parliament. Then after exiting his car he was able to stab a policeman before he was shot by other officers. In all, four people were killed and forty others injured.

And again as reported by The Sun, ISIS went to the Internet on what is described a secret site asking followers to launch “lone-wolf” attacks on London targets.

Now it's our turn to receive a cyber-warning.

The Sun is again reporting that ISIS warlords have drawn up a hit list of more than 8,700 American targets, telling radical followers already embedded on American soil to “kill them wherever you find them.” The orders have reportedly been passed on by the pro-ISIS hacking group United Cyber Caliphate.

To make matters even more concerning, ISIS is threatening to release personal information including home addresses of American religious leaders including Muslims. And according to The Sun those also targeted will include “politicians and known celebrities who have spoken out against ISIS.”

What is fascinating, in the latest book published by the Tom Clancy conglomerate titled “True Faith and Allegiance,” just such a strategy was foreseen by Mark Greaney, who now writes the Jack Ryan novels since Clancy's passing in 2013.

According to the storyline, personal information in the hands of terrorists is viewed as valuable in destabilizing and demoralizing America in their fight against ISIS. What the terrorist army cannot win on the battlefield, they see the targeting of soft targets, especially against unsuspecting military personnel and their families or U.S. security agents on the home front as an effective means of deflating the interests of the United States. Anyone who has faithfully read Tom Clancy's novels over the years will know that Clancy always seemed a step ahead in being able to predict what America's enemies were up to.

To the critics of the current administration, the attacks throughout Europe and those that have taken place in America such as San Bernardino seem to mean little when the subject arises of protecting America against attacks in the heartland. Efforts to block improved vetting, stemming the free flow of illegals, criminals and potential terrorists across our southern borders and attempts to follow the law against those who break our laws and who should not be in our country have all met with obstruction from indignant mayors, activist judges and naive protests.

None of it makes sense. There are no attempts to stop legal immigration. But none of this matters to those who unabashedly resist any efforts to prevent such attacks that we have been forewarned as coming to America's doorstep, in the same vein as was forewarned to both England and Russia.

I wonder just how any protester or any mayor of a sanctuary city would react if any loved ones or constituents would become victims to such an attack, and knowing they could have been more involved in preventing an attack that we knew was coming?

Bob Rinearson is a resident of Fort Wayne.

Comments

News-Sentinel.com reserves the right to remove any content appearing on its website. Our policy will be to remove postings that constitute profanity, obscenity, libel, spam, invasion of privacy, impersonation of another, or attacks on racial, ethnic or other groups. For more information, see our user rules page.
comments powered by Disqus