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Local woman seeks to give a hand up with culinary skills

By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelThe current plan for Out of a Jam is to be an eight-week program, meeting three days a week for 3-4 hours a day, starting in September with 12 students per class. The women in the classes will receive a food handlers certification and basic culinary skills. Three weeks will focus on workforce development to allow them to have better skills in the workplace. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelThe current plan for Out of a Jam is to be an eight-week program, meeting three days a week for 3-4 hours a day, starting in September with 12 students per class. The women in the classes will receive a food handlers certification and basic culinary skills. Three weeks will focus on workforce development to allow them to have better skills in the workplace. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman said she knew she wanted to do something in the culinary field for a long time. "It's something that comes very easy to me and very naturally," said Kaufman. She has a notebook where she keeps her recipes with various markings to change certain ingredients. After she gets the ingredients the way she wants them, she transfers the recipes into a book. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman said she knew she wanted to do something in the culinary field for a long time. "It's something that comes very easy to me and very naturally," said Kaufman. She has a notebook where she keeps her recipes with various markings to change certain ingredients. After she gets the ingredients the way she wants them, she transfers the recipes into a book. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman is the founder of Out of a Jam, a nonprofit program that wants to help the women of Fort Wayne that are coming out of different situations, like abuse, tragedies or addiction. She is raising funds and hopes to start classes in September. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman is the founder of Out of a Jam, a nonprofit program that wants to help the women of Fort Wayne that are coming out of different situations, like abuse, tragedies or addiction. She is raising funds and hopes to start classes in September. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelEvery Saturday at the YLNI Farmers Market at Barr and Wayne streets, Paula Kaufman will be there selling jams baked goods to spread the word and raise money for Out of a Jam. They allow customers to sample the different types of jams before buying them. "We spread the word one spoonful at a time," Kaufman joked. Each week, they try to have 10-12 varieties every week, while also adding new flavors. The jams cost $9 a piece. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelEvery Saturday at the YLNI Farmers Market at Barr and Wayne streets, Paula Kaufman will be there selling jams baked goods to spread the word and raise money for Out of a Jam. They allow customers to sample the different types of jams before buying them. "We spread the word one spoonful at a time," Kaufman joked. Each week, they try to have 10-12 varieties every week, while also adding new flavors. The jams cost $9 a piece. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman plans for Out of a Jam to begin by teaching students how to make different kinds of jams. Then students will start learning how to make baked goods that can go with jam, such as crackers, flatbread, scones and biscuits. As the program grows in the future, Kaufman hopes to add other skill sets like commercial cleaning or business skills, depending on the volunteers. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman plans for Out of a Jam to begin by teaching students how to make different kinds of jams. Then students will start learning how to make baked goods that can go with jam, such as crackers, flatbread, scones and biscuits. As the program grows in the future, Kaufman hopes to add other skill sets like commercial cleaning or business skills, depending on the volunteers. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman feels that she has reached a point where she has her head, her heart and her hands to work with and it is time to use them together. "It's time to stop talking about helping people, and step up and do it," Kaufman said. She also hopes to eventually do a class for men and teens. But right now, she wants to help the women of Fort Wayne and give them a hand up. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman feels that she has reached a point where she has her head, her heart and her hands to work with and it is time to use them together. "It's time to stop talking about helping people, and step up and do it," Kaufman said. She also hopes to eventually do a class for men and teens. But right now, she wants to help the women of Fort Wayne and give them a hand up. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman, founder of Out of a Jam, decided to start the nonprofit program because she realized a number of women who were struggling with supporting their families at a previous job. After an on the job accident that required shoulder surgery, Kaufman thought if they had better skills, they could get a better job. That's when she decided to step in. 
By Breanna Daugherty of The News-SentinelPaula Kaufman, founder of Out of a Jam, decided to start the nonprofit program because she realized a number of women who were struggling with supporting their families at a previous job. After an on the job accident that required shoulder surgery, Kaufman thought if they had better skills, they could get a better job. That's when she decided to step in. 
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press

Tuesday, June 21, 2016 6:54 AM

Sometimes, you just need a hand up in life.

And that’s what Paula Kaufman is hoping to do with Out of a Jam for women in Fort Wayne who are coming out of difficult situations, such as abuse, tragedies or addiction.

Out of a Jam is a nonprofit program to help women learn basic culinary skills and receive their food handlers certification.

She expects the program to be an eight-week course, meeting three to four hours a day, three days a week, starting in September. Kaufman plans to teach 12 students per class. Three weeks will focus on workforce development to improve students' skills in the workplace.

Kaufman plans for students in Out of a Jam to start learning how to make different kinds of jams. Then they will learn to make baked goods that can go with jam, such as crackers, flatbread, scones and biscuits.

As program grows in the future, Kaufman hopes to add other skill sets for other lines of work, such as commercial cleaning or business skills, depending on the volunteers. She also hopes to eventually do a class for men and teens.

The founder said they’re still in the fundraising stage of their program. One way they’re raising money is by selling jam at the YLNI Farmers Market every Saturday at Barr and Wayne streets. She sells jars of jams for $9, and there are other baked goods. Customers are allowed to sample the jams before buying. Kaufman tells her story at these times, as well as giving a handout to be contacted if they want to volunteer.

“We spread the word one spoonful at a time,” said Kaufman.

Go to outofajamfortwayne.com to learn more.

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