• Newsletters
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
°
Monday, May 22, 2017
View complete forecast
News-Sentinel.com Your Town. Your Voice.

Etiquette column: Wedding location influences wording on wedding invitations

Karen Hickman
Karen Hickman
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press

Use formal wording on invitation for a traditional wedding ceremony.

Friday, May 12, 2017 12:01 am

Q: What is the proper wording on a wedding invitation if the wedding is not in a church? Does it differ from the wording used for a church wedding?

A: The wedding invitation sets the tone for the wedding itself, and the style and wording of the invitation should reflect the type of wedding you are having.

A church wedding traditionally uses wording that is different from the wording used for a non-church ceremony. For instance, if the parents of the bride are announcing and hosting the wedding, the traditional wording for a church wedding would be:

“Mr. and Mrs. James Edward Smith

request the honour of your presence

at the marriage of their daughter,

Jennifer Anne

to

Mr. William Michael Jones, ... .”

The spelling of "honour" is the formal spelling and traditionally used instead of the more common spelling, "honor."

If your wedding is held in a venue other than a church, your wording would change to:

“Mr and Mrs. James Edward Smith

request the pleasure of your company

at the marriage of their daughter

Jennifer Anne

to

Mr. William Michael Jones, ... .”

These two examples are the most commonly used on wedding invitations. However, wording may differ with different religious ceremonies and different cultures.

For instance, a Roman Catholic ceremony may read:

“Mr and Mrs. James Edward Smith

request the honour of your presence

at the Nuptial Mass uniting their daughter

Jennifer Anne

to

Mr. William Michael Jones, ... .”

Using this wording tells you that their will be a full Mass at the ceremony, which will make the ceremony a little longer.

According to Jewish tradition, women are not married “to” men, they are joined by God. Therefore, the joining word on the invitation would be replaced with “and” instead of “to.” It is also very common for the groom's parents to be listed under the groom's name, such as “son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Green, ... .”

Listing the groom's parents on other invitations is optional, unless they are participating in hosting the wedding.

Karen Hickman is a local certified etiquette/protocol consultant and owner of Professional Courtesy. Email questions to features@news-sentinel.com.

Comments

News-Sentinel.com reserves the right to remove any content appearing on its website. Our policy will be to remove postings that constitute profanity, obscenity, libel, spam, invasion of privacy, impersonation of another, or attacks on racial, ethnic or other groups. For more information, see our user rules page.
comments powered by Disqus