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Indiana theaters among last digital holdouts

In a Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013 photo, a hand-drawn diagram in the projector room of the Indiana Theater in Terre Haute, Ind., shows the projector operator how to load the film. The head is used to identify which reel of the movie is inside the projector. As Colt Peterson and Alexis York “break down” the movie “Carrie” into six reels, a head will be used to identify the correct order when the film is re-assembled in the next location. The technology of 35-millimeter film remains virtually unchanged since the Indiana's massive screen first lit up with the silent picture, “Cappy Ricks.” Change has come, though, after more than a century. (Photo By The Associated Press)
In a Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013 photo, a hand-drawn diagram in the projector room of the Indiana Theater in Terre Haute, Ind., shows the projector operator how to load the film. The head is used to identify which reel of the movie is inside the projector. As Colt Peterson and Alexis York “break down” the movie “Carrie” into six reels, a head will be used to identify the correct order when the film is re-assembled in the next location. The technology of 35-millimeter film remains virtually unchanged since the Indiana's massive screen first lit up with the silent picture, “Cappy Ricks.” Change has come, though, after more than a century. (Photo By The Associated Press)
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.The Associated Press
Sunday, November 24, 2013 04:36 pm
TERRE HAUTE — A handful of movie theaters in western Indiana are among the nation's last holdouts in the movie industry's conversion from film to digital formats.The Indiana and Meadows theaters in Terre Haute and the Walnut Theater in Brazil still use 35-millimeter film in their projector rooms. They're among only 9 percent of American cinema houses that haven't converted to digital projection systems.

But the Tribune-Star reports all three of those theaters are preparing to make the switch.

Terre Haute's historic Indiana Theater is preparing to switch to a digital projection system while also enabling the theater to continue using film. Owner Rob Lundstrom plans to maintain the building's film projection booth and equipment, while installing a compact digital projector in the middle of the auditorium.

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