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Offers keep rolling in for recruit Hyron Edwards

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For more on recruiting, follow Pete DiPrimio via Twitter at www.twitter.com/pdiprimio

Purdue, Indiana remain in prime contention

Sunday, July 21, 2013 - 12:01 am

FISHERS, Ind. -- Hyron Edwards is on fire, and it's not just because of the heat.

The Indiana Elite 2015 point guard is picking up prime time recruiting interest nearly every time he answers the phone.

Why?

Better play through better health.

The latest to target Edwards are Florida, Miami of Florida, Vanderbilt, Kansas, DePaul and Northwestern.

That's in addition to Indiana, Purdue, Michigan and, well, like we said, the guy is on fire.

“My process is going all right. I've gotten some new schools. That's pretty good.”

Heat doesn't bring arrogance. Edwards seems too mature for that.

“I'm staying humble,” he says. “I talk to my parents and friends. I stay humble all the time. I'm working on my game every single day.”

Yes, every day athletes talk about doing the right thing, then sometimes do something else. But Edwards has a good thing going and he seems to know it.

So do coaches. Indiana head coach Tom Crean and Michigan assistant coach Jeff Meyer sat a chair apart and watched Edwards during this weekend's Crossroads Challenge at the Fisher Fieldhouse. Purdue coach Matt Painter and Michigan head coach John Beilein did the same thing the next day.

Yes, Crean and Meyer had a well-publicized heat-of-the-moment exchange last March -- following IU's dramatic end-of-regular-season victory in Ann Arbor that gave the Hoosiers their first outright Big Ten title in 20 years – that reflected the fiercely competitive nature of the sport and the men who direct it. It had as much lasting impact as a head butt from a fly.

Anyway, that meant nothing to Edwards, who continues to build his game while helping to lead Indiana Elite back to dominating form. He's healthier now than he's been through most of the summer, when ankle and knee injuries limited him, and likely cost him rating status. He's ranked No. 91 in the Class of 2015 by Rivals.com, a national Internet recruiting service.

During last week's adidas Invitational, he overcame a deep thigh bruise to help Indiana Elite win the 16-and-under championship. He scored 33 points in that victory.

“I feel better,” he says. “I went home and iced it and worked on my knee. I feel good. I'm 100 percent.”

A 100-percent Edwards is a formidable player. The caliber of the schools recruiting him is a prime example.

The good thing -- he takes nothing for granted.

“I'm working on everything. I work on my pull-up pass. Just be a great point guard.”

A great point guard in the 21st Century means a guy who can score and pass at a high level. The key, Edwards says, is vision and anticipation to know when to do what.

“When a (defender) commits on me, I know my man is open under the basket or on the wing. That's all I do actually. Read the defense before the play happens.”

It sounds simple -- shoot if you're open, pass if you're not -- but in a fast-paced game against strong competition, it isn't.

“Not really,” Edwards says. “Sometimes teams are jumping at you and make you speed up. It's cool.”

The addition of heralded guard Jalen Coleman (rated No. 30) to Indiana Elite's already powerful team -- it won six of seven tournaments last year -- suggested instant dominance. It didn't quite work out that way. As with the Miami Heat, chemistry and rhythm take time.

More work remains. Indiana Elite's 89-88 loss to MBA Select Saturday afternoon eliminated the team from championship contention.

Indiana Elite has one last July title chance -- next week in Las Vegas.

“We're looking forward to that,” Edwards says. “We won it last year. We have a chip on our shoulders now. We have to play hard.”

That's especially true for Edwards, who at 5-10 and 160 pounds is far from Big Ten preferred size. He has pounds to gain, strength to build and skills to develop.

“I'm working on everything,” he said again.

Fire, it seems, brings perspective.