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Humbled Toyota rolls out new Tundra pickup

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. The Associated Press
Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 1:57 pm

DETROIT – When Toyota's hefty new Tundra pickup went on sale in 2007, the Japanese automaker trumpeted it as a game-changer that would challenge Detroit for the only part of the market it still dominated.

"The truck that's changing it all," was the tagline from an ad that featured the beefy Tundra pulling a 10,000-pound trailer up a steep ramp.

But in six years on the market, the Tundra hasn't changed much of anything. It did teach Toyota that unlike car buyers, American pickup owners are still fiercely loyal to their Fords, Chevrolets and Rams.

Thursday morning, Toyota unveiled a redesigned Tundra at the Chicago Auto Show, this time without lofty sales goals or talk of breaking into Detroit's lucrative stronghold.

The new Tundra comes with an aggressive aerodynamic exterior, an all-new interior and a long list of practical and luxury features. But the choice of three engines is unchanged, and the company seems happy just to protect the Tundra's 5 percent share of the U.S. pickup market – especially when pickup sales are rising as the economy recovers from the Great Recession.

"They'll be part of the recovery," says Jeff Schuster, senior vice president of forecasting for LMC Automotive, an industry consulting firm. "I don't see them capturing any share from the Detroit guys."

Before the 2007 redesign, the Tundra didn't measure up to the Ford F-Series, Chevrolet Silverado and Chrysler's Ram. It was smaller and didn't have the powerful engines needed to tow trailers or haul heavy loads. Sales in 2006 – a huge year for trucks – were just under 125,000, respectable but only a fraction of the nearly 800,000 F-Series trucks sold by Ford.